General Information

How to Build a Stretcher Bar and Stretch your Canvas.

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Click here for more information on how to fold your canvas corners.

http://www.wunderbars.com/how-to-fold-canvas-corners.html


How to Correctly Clean Your Brushes


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How to Gesso Your Canvas Or Panel.


Composition Notes

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Beginning Your Drawings

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Drawing Technique Videos & Chart

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Why Bother with an Underpainting?

I found the following images on Anne Kullaf's Blog Loosen Up. It is an excellent example of underpainting and the development of a painting.
This first image shows an incomplete underpainting that resolves issues of proportion and begins to address value. This underpainting was done using a tinted ground (gesso and some light red ochre) and burnt umber. The values are beginning to be established by the use of washes to block in medium and light values and an undiluted application will block in the darker values.

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Notice in this slide the underpainting is blocking in the rest of the background information. Underpaintings are meant to establish a firm structure for your painting but do not need to be resolved and finished in the same way that a finished painting is finished. Notice how loose and gestural the figures and marks are.

 This slide illustrates the initial blocking in of color. Notice that we are working with large simple blocks of color or shape, always work from large simple shapes down to smaller more complex shapes. Resist the urge to jump into details.

This slide illustrates the initial blocking in of color. Notice that we are working with large simple blocks of color or shape, always work from large simple shapes down to smaller more complex shapes. Resist the urge to jump into details.

 More color is being introduced. Notice that the artist is starting to work into smaller shapes and that some areas of the underpainting are showing through. You do not have to always use a neutral color but you can see here why it may be helpful because it is harmonious with the palette being used. Imagine if the preliminary underpainting was completed in a bright red or neon green and imagine the effect that might have.

More color is being introduced. Notice that the artist is starting to work into smaller shapes and that some areas of the underpainting are showing through. You do not have to always use a neutral color but you can see here why it may be helpful because it is harmonious with the palette being used. Imagine if the preliminary underpainting was completed in a bright red or neon green and imagine the effect that might have.

 The artist is continuing to refine the painting and developing a nice range of values by mixing tints tones and shades of color. Edges are being cleaned up and objects are brought to a higher level of clarity.

The artist is continuing to refine the painting and developing a nice range of values by mixing tints tones and shades of color. Edges are being cleaned up and objects are brought to a higher level of clarity.

 This is the finalized painting. At this point, the artist has provided "eye candy" using fully saturated jewel-like colors to add details like the lettering in the sign for the restaurant.

This is the finalized painting. At this point, the artist has provided "eye candy" using fully saturated jewel-like colors to add details like the lettering in the sign for the restaurant.

 This is a detail of one of the figures in this painting. This is a wonderful example that sometimes less is more. The face of this figure is merely suggested through tonal variation as opposed to being meticulously rendered. As an artist, you will have to make decisions about how much information to supply the viewer. This is an extremely useful tool to guide the viewer's eye around your work.

This is a detail of one of the figures in this painting. This is a wonderful example that sometimes less is more. The face of this figure is merely suggested through tonal variation as opposed to being meticulously rendered. As an artist, you will have to make decisions about how much information to supply the viewer. This is an extremely useful tool to guide the viewer's eye around your work.

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Acrylic Paint Set-up & Clean-Up

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Acrylic Painting Techniques 

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Painting Edges & Gradients 


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Drawing & Painting I

Art and the Mind’s Eye: How Drawing Trains You to See the World More Clearly and to Live with a Deeper Sense of Presence

A passionate case for learning “to search into the cause of beauty, and penetrate the minutest parts of loveliness.”


BY MARIA POPOVA via Brain PIckings

“It’s only when we look with eyes of love that we see as the painter sees,” Henry Miller wrote in his forgotten 1968 gem To Paint Is to Love Again. Drawing, indeed, transforms the secret passageway between the eye and the heart into a two-way street — while we are wired to miss the vast majority of what goes on around us, learning to draw rewires us to see the world differently, to love it more intimately by attending to and coming to cherish its previously invisible details. This, perhaps, is why beloved artist Lynda Barry teaches visual storytelling as the infinitely rewarding art of “being present and seeing what’s there.”

More than a century before Miller and a century and a half before Barry, the great Victorian art critic, philosopher, and philanthropist John Ruskin (February 8, 1819–January 20, 1900) examined the psychology of why drawing helps us see the world more richly in a fantastic piece unambiguously titled Essay on the Relative Dignity of the Studies of Painting and Music, and the Advantages to be Derived from Their Pursuit, penned when he was only nineteen. It is included in the first volume of the altogether indispensable The Works of John Ruskin (public library | free ebook).

It’s a beautiful meditation triply timely today, in an age when we — having succumbed to the “aesthetic consumerism” of photography — are likelier to view the world through our camera phones and likelier still to point those at ourselves rather than at nature’s infinite and infinitely overlooked enchantments. To draw today is to reclaim the dignity and private joy of seeing amid a culture obsessed with looking in public.

Ruskin writes:

Let two persons go out for a walk; the one a good sketcher, the other having no taste of the kind. Let them go down a green lane. There will be a great difference in the scene as perceived by the two individuals. The one will see a lane and trees; he will perceive the trees to be green, though he will think nothing about it; he will see that the sun shines, and that it has a cheerful effect, but that the trees make the lane shady and cool; and he will see an old woman in a red cloak; — et voilà tout!

But what will the sketcher see? His eye is accustomed to search into the cause of beauty, and penetrate the minutest parts of loveliness. He looks up, and observes how the showery and subdivided sunshine comes sprinkled down among the gleaming leaves overhead, till the air is filled with the emerald light, and the motes dance in the green, glittering lines that shoot down upon the thicker masses of clustered foliage that stand out so bright and beautiful from the dark, retiring shadows of the inner tree, where the white light again comes flashing in from behind, like showers of stars; and here and there a bough is seen emerging from the veil of leaves, of a hundred varied colours, where the old and gnarled wood is covered with the brightness, — the jewel brightness of the emerald moss, or the variegated and fantastic lichens, white and blue, purple and red, all mellowed and mingled into a garment of beauty from the old withered branch. Then come the cavernous trunks, and the twisted roots that grasp with their snake-like coils at the steep bank, whose turfy slope is inlaid with flowers of a thousand dyes, each with his diadem of dew: and down like a visiting angel, looks one ray of golden light, and passes over the glittering turf — kiss, — kiss, — kissing every blossom, until the laughing flowers have lighted up the lips of the grass with one bright and beautiful smile, that is seen far, far away among the shadows of the old trees, like a gleam of summer lightening along the darkness of an evening cloud.

Is not this worth seeing? Yet if you are not a sketcher you will pass along the green lane, and when you come home again, have nothing to say or to think about it, but that you went down such and such a lane.


Drawing not only grants us a more intimate presence with the world but also extends an irresistible invitation for storytelling — that old woman in the red cloak, Ruskin argues, would be a mere passing stranger for the non-sketcher but the sketcher’s mind will envelop her in “an immense deal of speculation” as he seeks to place her properly in the context of the landscape, invariably playing out various possible stories of who she is and how she ended up there. This impulse for creative speculation, Ruskin asserts, is at the core of how the artist sees the world differently:

From the most insignificant circumstance, — from a bird on a railing, a wooden bridge over a stream, a broken branch, a child in a pinafore, or a waggoner in a frock, does the artist derive amusement, improvement, and speculation. In everything it is the same; where a common eye sees only a white cloud, the artist observes the exquisite gradations of light and shade, the loveliness of the mingled colours — red, purple, grey, golden, and white; the graceful roundings of form, the shadowy softness of the melted outline, the brightness without lustre, the transparency without faintness, and the beautiful mildness of the deep heaven that looks out among the snowy cloud with its soft blue eyes; — in fact, the enjoyment of the sketcher from the contemplation of nature is a thing which to another is almost incomprehensible. If a person who had no taste for drawing were at once to be endowed with both the taste and power, he would feel, on looking out upon nature, almost like a blind man who had just received his sight.

The Works of John Ruskin is a trove of timeless wisdom in its totality. Complement this particular piece with Miller’s wonderful To Paint Is to Love Again and Ruskin on the value of imperfection in creative work. If you’re looking to learn this enormously rewarding way of seeing, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is by far the best initiation.

Thanks, Rob

Review Questions

  1. Who benefits from this practice?

  2. What is one way you could help increase your ability to see what is around you throughout the day?

  3. Where is there the most need for this?

  4. Take 5 minutes to observe the room, choose a spot that stands out as interesting or exciting and begin recording what you see in your sketchbook. develop your drawing for a total of 15 minutes.

  5. List 5 things you noticed that you might not have previously noticed (before attempting this exercise.)

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Drawing Bootcamp

Create an assortment of drawings using a variety of techniques and approaches.

Draw the Line

Step 1: . Select a simple image for drawing. 

Step 2: Create a 4" x 4" grid on your 12" x 12" paper.

Step 3: Create a line drawing demonstrating the following qualities, one per box:

Structural, Outline, Contour, Gesture, Sketch, Calligraphy, Line Personality (x3)

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 Draw & Paint Syllabus  October 13, 2017   DRAWING X PAINTING    COURSE SYLLABUS    MR. MCQUILLING-BARRON    SCHOOL YEAR- FALL 2017 SPRING 2018      Course Overview   This course is designed to provide a broad overview of drawing x painting. A variety of methods, materials and techniques will be introduced to encourage exploration, experimentation and development of skill and knowledge. The content for this class will be derived from the four components below which I believe will ensure a well-rounded art education experience.  • Aesthetics- Learning to understand the nature, beauty, experience, meaning and value of art  • Art History- Acquiring knowledge about the contributions artists and art make to society and culture, acknowledging the contributions of other cultures.  • Art Criticism- Learning how to respond to art, learning how to make judgments about the properties and qualities in visual form. Becoming familiar with using and understanding the Elements and Principles of Design  • Art Production- Making and creating art!     Painting X Drawing is taught in three sections.   •  Drawing X Painting 1 - Students will build the fundamental skills in observational drawing and  painting. This section will emphasize the use of the elements in accordance to the principles to  create strong work.  •  Drawing X Painting 2 - Students will continue to focus on observational painting and drawing while  introducing concepts of abstraction and artistic voice. This course will build on basic painting  methods, procedures and color theory.  •  Advanced Drawing X Painting  - This course is designed to prepare a portfolio quality body of work  in a variety of painting and drawing media. Lessons include observational drawing/painting,  abstraction, issues in contemporary art, student voice and conceptual development.    Assessments / Grading for each marking period     Projects = 100 points   For each class project you will be given a handout describing the assignment, objectives and criteria of the lesson. You will be graded on creativity, level of effort, and craftsmanship (**see sample rubric)   Exams   = 40-50 points   Your knowledge of the subject matter, media techniques and vocabulary will be assessed through one  exam after the completion of each project lesson.     In class assignments  = 20-40 points  Sketches, notebooks, and reflection sheets will be graded and checked as “in class” assignments     Community Collaboration & Discussion (Daily Points) = 20-40 points   This grade will be based on your group critiques, in class work habits, class discussion clarification  and clean up.     *Notebook Folders   You will be responsible for keeping all notes, handouts, sketches and exams. This folder will be kept in  class, distributed and collected during class time.     Studio Expectations  • Listen to and follow directions.  • Raise your hand to contribute.  • Be nice.     Student Support   • Reminder/ Warning  • Mindfulness Break  • Extended Mindfulness Break     Daily Points   4 Points available every day:  • 1 point for entering class quietly.  • 1 point for listening attentively.  • 1 point for good effort.  • 1 point for cleaning your space and leaving quietly.     PLEASE BE READY.   • Please come into the studio ready for creative action.  • Take folders and sketchbooks out upon entering the room.  • Please do your best to focus on your work with minimal talking/distractions.     Notes/ Passes   • Please request my written permission to miss class when involved in any activity outside this class  • 10/10 rule for Hall pass. Please be mindful and considerate of your pass usage. Sign the Pass out  in the Marble Composition book. This is for school and student safety purposes.     Absences   • Please be responsible for getting any work, assignments or information that you missed during  your absence  • Sports/Club participants- I ask that you inform me ahead of time of games, practices or events  that involve you missing class.  Additional studio time to work on projects: see white board for availability/times.    I’m looking forward to getting to know you and working with you this year!  Sincerely,  Mr. McQuilling-Barron      Parent/Guardian X ____________________________________________      Student X ___________________________________________________

Draw & Paint Syllabus

October 13, 2017

DRAWING X PAINTING

COURSE SYLLABUS

MR. MCQUILLING-BARRON

SCHOOL YEAR- FALL 2017 SPRING 2018

Course Overview

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of drawing x painting. A variety of methods, materials and techniques will be introduced to encourage exploration, experimentation and development of skill and knowledge. The content for this class will be derived from the four components below which I believe will ensure a well-rounded art education experience.

• Aesthetics- Learning to understand the nature, beauty, experience, meaning and value of art

• Art History- Acquiring knowledge about the contributions artists and art make to society and culture, acknowledging the contributions of other cultures.

• Art Criticism- Learning how to respond to art, learning how to make judgments about the properties and qualities in visual form. Becoming familiar with using and understanding the Elements and Principles of Design

• Art Production- Making and creating art!

Painting X Drawing is taught in three sections.

Drawing X Painting 1- Students will build the fundamental skills in observational drawing and

painting. This section will emphasize the use of the elements in accordance to the principles to

create strong work.

Drawing X Painting 2- Students will continue to focus on observational painting and drawing while

introducing concepts of abstraction and artistic voice. This course will build on basic painting

methods, procedures and color theory.

Advanced Drawing X Painting - This course is designed to prepare a portfolio quality body of work

in a variety of painting and drawing media. Lessons include observational drawing/painting,

abstraction, issues in contemporary art, student voice and conceptual development.


Assessments / Grading for each marking period

Projects = 100 points

For each class project you will be given a handout describing the assignment, objectives and criteria of the lesson. You will be graded on creativity, level of effort, and craftsmanship (**see sample rubric)

Exams = 40-50 points

Your knowledge of the subject matter, media techniques and vocabulary will be assessed through one

exam after the completion of each project lesson.

In class assignments = 20-40 points

Sketches, notebooks, and reflection sheets will be graded and checked as “in class” assignments

Community Collaboration & Discussion (Daily Points) = 20-40 points

This grade will be based on your group critiques, in class work habits, class discussion clarification

and clean up.

*Notebook Folders

You will be responsible for keeping all notes, handouts, sketches and exams. This folder will be kept in

class, distributed and collected during class time.

Studio Expectations
• Listen to and follow directions.

• Raise your hand to contribute.

• Be nice.

Student Support

• Reminder/ Warning

• Mindfulness Break

• Extended Mindfulness Break

Daily Points

4 Points available every day:

• 1 point for entering class quietly.

• 1 point for listening attentively.

• 1 point for good effort.

• 1 point for cleaning your space and leaving quietly.

PLEASE BE READY.

• Please come into the studio ready for creative action.

• Take folders and sketchbooks out upon entering the room.

• Please do your best to focus on your work with minimal talking/distractions.

Notes/ Passes

• Please request my written permission to miss class when involved in any activity outside this class

• 10/10 rule for Hall pass. Please be mindful and considerate of your pass usage. Sign the Pass out

in the Marble Composition book. This is for school and student safety purposes.

Absences

• Please be responsible for getting any work, assignments or information that you missed during

your absence

• Sports/Club participants- I ask that you inform me ahead of time of games, practices or events

that involve you missing class.

Additional studio time to work on projects: see white board for availability/times.

I’m looking forward to getting to know you and working with you this year!

Sincerely,

Mr. McQuilling-Barron

Parent/Guardian X ____________________________________________

Student X ___________________________________________________

Drawing & Painting II

Art and the Mind’s Eye: How Drawing Trains You to See the World More Clearly and to Live with a Deeper Sense of Presence

A passionate case for learning “to search into the cause of beauty, and penetrate the minutest parts of loveliness.”


BY MARIA POPOVA via Brain PIckings

“It’s only when we look with eyes of love that we see as the painter sees,” Henry Miller wrote in his forgotten 1968 gem To Paint Is to Love Again. Drawing, indeed, transforms the secret passageway between the eye and the heart into a two-way street — while we are wired to miss the vast majority of what goes on around us, learning to draw rewires us to see the world differently, to love it more intimately by attending to and coming to cherish its previously invisible details. This, perhaps, is why beloved artist Lynda Barry teaches visual storytelling as the infinitely rewarding art of “being present and seeing what’s there.”

More than a century before Miller and a century and a half before Barry, the great Victorian art critic, philosopher, and philanthropist John Ruskin (February 8, 1819–January 20, 1900) examined the psychology of why drawing helps us see the world more richly in a fantastic piece unambiguously titled Essay on the Relative Dignity of the Studies of Painting and Music, and the Advantages to be Derived from Their Pursuit, penned when he was only nineteen. It is included in the first volume of the altogether indispensable The Works of John Ruskin (public library | free ebook).

It’s a beautiful meditation triply timely today, in an age when we — having succumbed to the “aesthetic consumerism” of photography — are likelier to view the world through our camera phones and likelier still to point those at ourselves rather than at nature’s infinite and infinitely overlooked enchantments. To draw today is to reclaim the dignity and private joy of seeing amid a culture obsessed with looking in public.

Ruskin writes:

Let two persons go out for a walk; the one a good sketcher, the other having no taste of the kind. Let them go down a green lane. There will be a great difference in the scene as perceived by the two individuals. The one will see a lane and trees; he will perceive the trees to be green, though he will think nothing about it; he will see that the sun shines, and that it has a cheerful effect, but that the trees make the lane shady and cool; and he will see an old woman in a red cloak; — et voilà tout!

But what will the sketcher see? His eye is accustomed to search into the cause of beauty, and penetrate the minutest parts of loveliness. He looks up, and observes how the showery and subdivided sunshine comes sprinkled down among the gleaming leaves overhead, till the air is filled with the emerald light, and the motes dance in the green, glittering lines that shoot down upon the thicker masses of clustered foliage that stand out so bright and beautiful from the dark, retiring shadows of the inner tree, where the white light again comes flashing in from behind, like showers of stars; and here and there a bough is seen emerging from the veil of leaves, of a hundred varied colours, where the old and gnarled wood is covered with the brightness, — the jewel brightness of the emerald moss, or the variegated and fantastic lichens, white and blue, purple and red, all mellowed and mingled into a garment of beauty from the old withered branch. Then come the cavernous trunks, and the twisted roots that grasp with their snake-like coils at the steep bank, whose turfy slope is inlaid with flowers of a thousand dyes, each with his diadem of dew: and down like a visiting angel, looks one ray of golden light, and passes over the glittering turf — kiss, — kiss, — kissing every blossom, until the laughing flowers have lighted up the lips of the grass with one bright and beautiful smile, that is seen far, far away among the shadows of the old trees, like a gleam of summer lightening along the darkness of an evening cloud.

Is not this worth seeing? Yet if you are not a sketcher you will pass along the green lane, and when you come home again, have nothing to say or to think about it, but that you went down such and such a lane.


Drawing not only grants us a more intimate presence with the world but also extends an irresistible invitation for storytelling — that old woman in the red cloak, Ruskin argues, would be a mere passing stranger for the non-sketcher but the sketcher’s mind will envelop her in “an immense deal of speculation” as he seeks to place her properly in the context of the landscape, invariably playing out various possible stories of who she is and how she ended up there. This impulse for creative speculation, Ruskin asserts, is at the core of how the artist sees the world differently:

From the most insignificant circumstance, — from a bird on a railing, a wooden bridge over a stream, a broken branch, a child in a pinafore, or a waggoner in a frock, does the artist derive amusement, improvement, and speculation. In everything it is the same; where a common eye sees only a white cloud, the artist observes the exquisite gradations of light and shade, the loveliness of the mingled colours — red, purple, grey, golden, and white; the graceful roundings of form, the shadowy softness of the melted outline, the brightness without lustre, the transparency without faintness, and the beautiful mildness of the deep heaven that looks out among the snowy cloud with its soft blue eyes; — in fact, the enjoyment of the sketcher from the contemplation of nature is a thing which to another is almost incomprehensible. If a person who had no taste for drawing were at once to be endowed with both the taste and power, he would feel, on looking out upon nature, almost like a blind man who had just received his sight.

The Works of John Ruskin is a trove of timeless wisdom in its totality. Complement this particular piece with Miller’s wonderful To Paint Is to Love Again and Ruskin on the value of imperfection in creative work. If you’re looking to learn this enormously rewarding way of seeing, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain is by far the best initiation.

Thanks, Rob

Review Questions

  1. Who benefits from this practice?

  2. What is one way you could help increase your ability to see what is around you throughout the day?

  3. Where is there the most need for this?

  4. Take 5 minutes to observe the room, choose a spot that stands out as interesting or exciting and begin recording what you see in your sketchbook. develop your drawing for a total of 15 minutes.

  5. List 5 things you noticed that you might not have previously noticed (before attempting this exercise.)

Master Copy Remix

Draw/Paint II

OVERVIEW & PURPOSE

Learning to paint is difficult… very difficult.  Just like most other traditions, it is very helpful to know who did it before you were around, and what they learned while doing it. This can help us from having to reinvent the wheel so to speak. Consider the remix in music, this is considered one of the highest forms of respect a musician can pay to another musician, to rework their song in their own unique way. In this project, you will be asked to abstract/deconstruct a painting by a modern master.

Stages of Abstraction

  1. Non-objective fragmentation: Simplifying shapes and color information, still refers to reality and may maintain 3 dimensional form.

  2. De-construction: Breaking down shapes into separate pieces, simplification of forms, beginning to have less depth.

  3. 2D: (flat. height & length only, no depth of field. May still loosely refer to recognizable images)

4. Non-figurative: (not realistic at all…shapes, color and line)

Learning Objectives

  1. Create an accurate translation of a master painting using a grid, projection or windshield wiper looking methods.

  2. Identify and practice a common color palette or the arbitrary color challenge.

  3. Develop/cultivate craftsmanship and the artistic studio habits of mind.

MATERIALS NEEDED

  1. Variety of drawing materials

  2. Tracing Paper

  1. Acrylic Paints/gesso

  2. Canvas bars, canvas, staples

ACTIVITY

  1. Select a master-copy to work from. SELECT FROM WORKS HERE

  2. Begin developing sketches from your master painting. Experiment with a variety of stages along the abstraction spectrum. Minimum 5 sketches. 1 Study.

  3. Identify which method of transfer you will use and transfer image.  (Grid vs. Windshield Wiper looking)

  4. Identify you palette (3-5 colors plus tints, tones and shades) and take some time to consider what colors will go where. Do not move on until you know what color every part of your drawing will be, a color study be completed in colored pencil beforehand.

  5. Palette Options: Monochromatic/achromatic, Complementary, Split Complementary, Warm/Cool Dominant, Triadic, Arbitrary Color, Inverse/Opposite Colors.

  6. Build, Gesso Canvas. Begin transferring images that you developed in thumbnail sketches and studies. Do not begin this step until you have thoroughly completed steps 1-5.

Dove-Shapes.jpg

  Draw/Paint Syllabus   October 13, 2017   DRAWING X PAINTING    COURSE SYLLABUS    MR. MCQUILLING-BARRON    SCHOOL YEAR- FALL 2017 SPRING 2018      Course Overview   This course is designed to provide a broad overview of drawing x painting. A variety of methods, materials and techniques will be introduced to encourage exploration, experimentation and development of skill and knowledge. The content for this class will be derived from the four components below which I believe will ensure a well-rounded art education experience.  • Aesthetics- Learning to understand the nature, beauty, experience, meaning and value of art  • Art History- Acquiring knowledge about the contributions artists and art make to society and culture, acknowledging the contributions of other cultures.  • Art Criticism- Learning how to respond to art, learning how to make judgments about the properties and qualities in visual form. Becoming familiar with using and understanding the Elements and Principles of Design  • Art Production- Making and creating art!     Painting X Drawing is taught in three sections.   •  Drawing X Painting 1 - Students will build the fundamental skills in observational drawing and  painting. This section will emphasize the use of the elements in accordance to the principles to  create strong work.  •  Drawing X Painting 2 - Students will continue to focus on observational painting and drawing while  introducing concepts of abstraction and artistic voice. This course will build on basic painting  methods, procedures and color theory.  •  Advanced Drawing X Painting  - This course is designed to prepare a portfolio quality body of work  in a variety of painting and drawing media. Lessons include observational drawing/painting,  abstraction, issues in contemporary art, student voice and conceptual development.    Assessments / Grading for each marking period     Projects = 100 points   For each class project you will be given a handout describing the assignment, objectives and criteria of the lesson. You will be graded on creativity, level of effort, and craftsmanship (**see sample rubric)   Exams   = 40-50 points   Your knowledge of the subject matter, media techniques and vocabulary will be assessed through one  exam after the completion of each project lesson.     In class assignments  = 20-40 points  Sketches, notebooks, and reflection sheets will be graded and checked as “in class” assignments     Community Collaboration & Discussion (Daily Points) = 20-40 points   This grade will be based on your group critiques, in class work habits, class discussion clarification  and clean up.     *Notebook Folders   You will be responsible for keeping all notes, handouts, sketches and exams. This folder will be kept in  class, distributed and collected during class time.     Studio Expectations  • Listen to and follow directions.  • Raise your hand to contribute.  • Be nice.     Student Support   • Reminder/ Warning  • Mindfulness Break  • Extended Mindfulness Break     Daily Points   4 Points available every day:  • 1 point for entering class quietly.  • 1 point for listening attentively.  • 1 point for good effort.  • 1 point for cleaning your space and leaving quietly.     PLEASE BE READY.   • Please come into the studio ready for creative action.  • Take folders and sketchbooks out upon entering the room.  • Please do your best to focus on your work with minimal talking/distractions.     Notes/ Passes   • Please request my written permission to miss class when involved in any activity outside this class  • 10/10 rule for Hall pass. Please be mindful and considerate of your pass usage. Sign the Pass out  in the Marble Composition book. This is for school and student safety purposes.     Absences   • Please be responsible for getting any work, assignments or information that you missed during  your absence  • Sports/Club participants- I ask that you inform me ahead of time of games, practices or events  that involve you missing class.  Additional studio time to work on projects: see white board for availability/times.    I’m looking forward to getting to know you and working with you this year!  Sincerely,  Mr. McQuilling-Barron      Parent/Guardian X ____________________________________________      Student X ___________________________________________________

Draw/Paint Syllabus

October 13, 2017

DRAWING X PAINTING

COURSE SYLLABUS

MR. MCQUILLING-BARRON

SCHOOL YEAR- FALL 2017 SPRING 2018

Course Overview

This course is designed to provide a broad overview of drawing x painting. A variety of methods, materials and techniques will be introduced to encourage exploration, experimentation and development of skill and knowledge. The content for this class will be derived from the four components below which I believe will ensure a well-rounded art education experience.

• Aesthetics- Learning to understand the nature, beauty, experience, meaning and value of art

• Art History- Acquiring knowledge about the contributions artists and art make to society and culture, acknowledging the contributions of other cultures.

• Art Criticism- Learning how to respond to art, learning how to make judgments about the properties and qualities in visual form. Becoming familiar with using and understanding the Elements and Principles of Design

• Art Production- Making and creating art!

Painting X Drawing is taught in three sections.

Drawing X Painting 1- Students will build the fundamental skills in observational drawing and

painting. This section will emphasize the use of the elements in accordance to the principles to

create strong work.

Drawing X Painting 2- Students will continue to focus on observational painting and drawing while

introducing concepts of abstraction and artistic voice. This course will build on basic painting

methods, procedures and color theory.

Advanced Drawing X Painting - This course is designed to prepare a portfolio quality body of work

in a variety of painting and drawing media. Lessons include observational drawing/painting,

abstraction, issues in contemporary art, student voice and conceptual development.


Assessments / Grading for each marking period

Projects = 100 points

For each class project you will be given a handout describing the assignment, objectives and criteria of the lesson. You will be graded on creativity, level of effort, and craftsmanship (**see sample rubric)

Exams = 40-50 points

Your knowledge of the subject matter, media techniques and vocabulary will be assessed through one

exam after the completion of each project lesson.

In class assignments = 20-40 points

Sketches, notebooks, and reflection sheets will be graded and checked as “in class” assignments

Community Collaboration & Discussion (Daily Points) = 20-40 points

This grade will be based on your group critiques, in class work habits, class discussion clarification

and clean up.

*Notebook Folders

You will be responsible for keeping all notes, handouts, sketches and exams. This folder will be kept in

class, distributed and collected during class time.

Studio Expectations
• Listen to and follow directions.

• Raise your hand to contribute.

• Be nice.

Student Support

• Reminder/ Warning

• Mindfulness Break

• Extended Mindfulness Break

Daily Points

4 Points available every day:

• 1 point for entering class quietly.

• 1 point for listening attentively.

• 1 point for good effort.

• 1 point for cleaning your space and leaving quietly.

PLEASE BE READY.

• Please come into the studio ready for creative action.

• Take folders and sketchbooks out upon entering the room.

• Please do your best to focus on your work with minimal talking/distractions.

Notes/ Passes

• Please request my written permission to miss class when involved in any activity outside this class

• 10/10 rule for Hall pass. Please be mindful and considerate of your pass usage. Sign the Pass out

in the Marble Composition book. This is for school and student safety purposes.

Absences

• Please be responsible for getting any work, assignments or information that you missed during

your absence

• Sports/Club participants- I ask that you inform me ahead of time of games, practices or events

that involve you missing class.

Additional studio time to work on projects: see white board for availability/times.

I’m looking forward to getting to know you and working with you this year!

Sincerely,

Mr. McQuilling-Barron

Parent/Guardian X ____________________________________________

Student X ___________________________________________________